Title
#thinking-together
Peter Saxton

Peter Saxton

08/16/2022, 3:39 PM
I enjoyed this talk on visually editing state machines and remix.js as a way for hiding certain implementation details that we normally have to deal with. I think there's a near future here.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r4xI6LPf6iQ

. The talk is a bit slow to get started
Ivan Lugo

Ivan Lugo

08/17/2022, 1:07 AM
State machines are life. If I can model all of my applications with state machines in an enterprise sort of situation, I absolutely will. All of my code tends to be “state shifting“. It’s how I think. The more tools we have to interact with definite states and how they interact with the system as a whole, well… The better things will be! Ha ha.
g

guitarvydas

08/17/2022, 9:22 AM
The classic paper on state machines for Software is Harel’s. The classic problem of state machines is “the state explosion problem”. Harel’s StateCharts takes care of that problem. My reading of the original StateChart Paper (@Ivan Lugo et al).
w

wtaysom

08/19/2022, 7:13 AM
Harel is a classic for a reason.
Ivan Lugo

Ivan Lugo

08/19/2022, 8:09 PM
@guitarvydas I’m excited to dig in those presentations. The first things I saw were language and diagrams around the concept of modular state machines. I want to see how that’s formalized up. I have a coworker that would chew this up too (ahem ahem @Blad Tellez) as we’ve been talking about this quite a bit. If I can grok StateCharts, I think I’ll end up with a brand new and useful organization tool for state management. That, as they say, is legit.