• Jim Meyer

    Jim Meyer

    3 months ago
    As a web dev I can't count the number of hours I've had to spend on re-loading a web page after an edit, and then clicking my way back to the state I'm actually trying to iterate on, even with hot module replacement enabled. Anyone know of visual programming projects where the user can execute their program, interact to change program state, pause program execution, edit the program to make changes, and then resume execution from that point on with a modified program? My current thinking is that there's a lot of potential edge cases where the program could break or fail due to undefined semantics, but there could be a sweet-spot for doing minor edits and staying productive due to not having to restart the program from scratch. Hot module replacement has become widely used, but that's limited by having to do traditional text-based coding, and it's only able to replace code at the module level. I'll illustrate one use case where I think there's a good tradeoff between complexity and reward for the user: • Open a page in the product being coded in a VPL environment • Open some kind of overlay, e.g. a dialog • Pause the program • Tweak the appearance of the dialog while remaining in the context of the current program state • Add new UI elements to the dialog (non-breaking changes) • Resume the program
    Jim Meyer
    Tom Larkworthy
    +3
    17 replies
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  • s

    Steve Dekorte

    3 months ago
    Are there any IDE's that allow you to visually interleave the stack trace with debug output, so you get a picture of which frames the output occurred within?
    s
    Tom Larkworthy
    +4
    10 replies
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  • Ivan Lugo

    Ivan Lugo

    3 months ago
    Sharing this because it’s one quote that I keep falling back on as motivation and validation that my desire to build a three-dimensional environment for software development is at least a path worth going down. It’s hard to come by that sometime 😃
    Ivan Lugo
    Alex Cruise
    +3
    18 replies
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  • Orion Reed

    Orion Reed

    3 months ago
    I’m trying to think of a qualifier term for a certain kind of mutability. Mutability as a language construct is well trodden ground, but there’s another kind of mutability that exists at a systems level which isn’t tied to language design or specific language. Things like filenames would fit in this category. These are often to do with naming but there are many cases where the mutating thing is structural, such as filesystem hierarchies, pointers to digital objects (latest X, agreed-upon version of Y, etc). This kind of mutability appears more varied and common than the concept in PL, but I don’t want to refer to it as just “mutability” because this could be misleading. “State” is not a sufficient notion either, as this is just referring to the value of a thing in relation to time. I’m doing some work on “Mutability as Governance” which argues that mutability (at least the kind I refer to here) is best understood as a digital governance problem, as it necessarily involves coordination between multiple systems in ways that mutability within a single language does not. Even pure functional languages interact with a stateful environment and require mutability in this sense (e.g. naming and structuring of source files) Terms like systemic/emergent mutability, inter-systemic mutability, or multi-party mutability have popped up but I don’t know if these really do a good job.
    Orion Reed
    p
    +8
    36 replies
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  • Alex Cruise

    Alex Cruise

    3 months ago
    There’s a recurring theme in my career, going back to my very first job, that goes under the mental headline of “wide logic” problems… That’s where you have a somewhat narrow stream (conceptually, not necessarily streaming per se) of data, and you need to evaluate a large number of functions against each item--at least a handful, often dozens, sometimes hundreds! The functions are basically always provided by the user, although normally in a declarative, non-Turing-complete DSL. I’m curious whether others have noticed this pattern, and whether you know of any more mainstream labels for it? The closest I’ve found is papers that reference publish/subscribe and indexing techniques for complex boolean expression trees, e.g.: • An efficient publish/subscribe index for e-commerce databases (VLDB ’14) • Analysis and optimization for boolean expression indexing [BE-Tree] (ACM Trans. DB. Sys. ’13) • A-Tree: A Dynamic Data Structure for Efficiently Indexing Arbitrary Boolean Expressions (SIGMOD/PODS ’21 … actually this is a new one for me, I need to read it now… 🙂)
    Alex Cruise
    ibdknox
    +1
    15 replies
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  • p

    Personal Dynamic Media

    3 months ago
    Is it possible that in our efforts to find alternatives to imperative programming, we have failed to promulgate knowledge about how to program imperatively? Back in the day, folks like Dijkstra, Hoare, Wirth, Knuth, and Naur did a lot of work on figuring out how to write imperative programs that did what they were intended to do. However, nowadays, I get the impression that much of the energy being spent on making programs better is focused on alternative ways to structure programs, like object oriented design, distributed and/or parallel and/or concurrent, event driven, reactive, etc. However, most of these design disciplines still involve executing chunks of imperative code, they just involve new and different ways of deciding which imperative code runs when. This may be a dull and boring idea, but is it possible that part of what we need in order to improve software is wider distribution and study of the old ways of writing correct imperative programs, so that more of the little chunks of imperative code that get executed during an object oriented or event driven program will do what they are supposed to do?
    p
    Alex Cruise
    +4
    7 replies
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  • Orion Reed

    Orion Reed

    3 months ago
    Does anyone know of FOC orgs (businesses and/or communities) that are run cooperatively/democratically? What are your thoughts on the intersection of democratic self-management and FOC projects? There’s often talk of “democratising” computing, and to me this often feels half-baked when the control is ultimately in private/undemocratic hands, even if the technology has emancipatory potential.
    Orion Reed
    i
    +2
    6 replies
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  • daltonb

    daltonb

    2 months ago
    here’s a question i’ve been chewing on in various forms; i’m interested both in responses and different ways the question may have been framed/answered before https://twitter.com/pixelflipping/status/1542195418670546945
    daltonb
    Tony Worm
    +2
    6 replies
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  • j

    Jan Ruzicka

    2 months ago
    What do you imagine under dynamic medium? Is there the dynamic medium, or are there more of them? What aspects of it are the most important? What tools will be used to interact with it (what are the analogs of pencils)? In what respect is it a medium -what does it mediate, and between whom? What kind of literacy will it enable?
    j
    p
    +1
    6 replies
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  • s

    Sergej Koščejev

    2 months ago
    I'm looking for some pointers/articles/papers on abstractions for incremental computations. Something that describes a Computation that can compute a value on demand and has Dependencies and the value is invalidated when one of the Dependencies change... and a Computation can also be a Dependency of another computation. But more detailed and more rigorous. Has anybody ever seen such a thing?
    s
    Konrad Hinsen
    +10
    20 replies
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