• Chris Knott

    Chris Knott

    2 years ago
    In Le Ton Beau de Marot there's this section about the revelatory nature of errors which I found fascinating. Apparently somebody accidentally said "Rosa only date shranks", instead of "Rosa only dated shrinks". That is, they applied to "make_past_tense()" function to "shrink" instead of "date"! Hofstadter mentions he has collected thousands of examples of errors like these (it's not clear if the "filing cabinet" he talks about is metaphorical or not). I think it might also be useful to collect programming errors in a similar way (maybe put on the wiki eventually). Patterns might start to emerge that are instructive to how people think about coding. These errors are quite precious because they become very rare once you have become fluent in the status quo. Most programming errors are of the type "failed to understand the full consequences of my code" or "failed to consider all possible inputs". These are the types of errors that pros make. I am more interested in the type of errors that beginners make, that might reveal friction between how they might naturally express themselves or understand, and how they are forced to by the language.
    Chris Knott
    opeispo
    +2
    7 replies
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  • curious_reader

    curious_reader

    2 years ago
  • i

    Ian Rumac

    2 years ago
    Got a question that’s been bugging me. Let’s say you create a new framework/language and accompanying tooling that saves time and money for dozens of developers all over the world. How do you balance openness and monetisation? Do you open source the framework/language but charge for the tools? Do you keep it closed source? Do you do self-hosted/SaaS and community/enterprise split like Gitlab for example? If you open it, how do you earn money to let you work on it full-time? If it isn’t hugely popular immediately, you will have a hard time balancing earning money to live and working on it. But if it’s closed, adoption will probably be low so customers/developers will be wary to use it.
    i
    m
    +1
    10 replies
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  • Mariano Guerra

    Mariano Guerra

    2 years ago
    Mariano Guerra
    m
    +2
    7 replies
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  • opeispo

    opeispo

    2 years ago
    Found the link to this course from the Summer school. Looks interesting so far. In case anyone wanted to take a look - https://people.csail.mit.edu/asolar/SynthesisCourse/Lecture1.htm
    opeispo
    ogadaki
    +1
    12 replies
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  • Brian Hempel

    Brian Hempel

    2 years ago
    Hello all! Please consider submitting to LIVE 2020, the Workshop on Live Programming. Traditionally, most submissions to LIVE are demos of novel programming submissions. We hope LIVE can be an opportunity to polish up your work a little and present your progress to the world, by video or PDF or web essay—just be sure to situate the work within the history of programming environments. The submission deadline is Sept 18, and the workshop itself will be online, tentatively Nov 17. The attached Call for Submissions has details, or visit the website: https://liveprog.org/
    Brian Hempel
    ogadaki
    2 replies
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  • Nick Smith

    Nick Smith

    2 years ago
    Has anyone ever come across (or thought about) a tagging system for data where nouns and adjectives play different roles? For example, you might search for a "user", but then refine that search to a "banned user". Note that "banned" and "user" are not necessarily independent tags. Just because someone is a "banned user" and a "father" doesn't mean they're a "banned father" as well. The adjective "banned" could specifically relate to the noun "user". Or a slightly clearer example: someone who is both a "skilled baker" and a "writer" is not necessarily a "skilled writer". I'm now wondering whether an understanding of (basic) linguistics is necessary to develop a good tagging system. After all, our mission is to adapt programming languages to the human mind 🤔. This is part of my search for "an ideal model for information" that readers might remember from a few weeks ago.
    Nick Smith
    a
    +8
    54 replies
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  • robenkleene

    robenkleene

    2 years ago
    Interesting Twitter thread proposing game engines are becoming more popular for non-gaming use cases. These were the most interesting examples he gave to me:
    The Mandalorian and The Lion King were shot almost exclusively using these tools.
    Even Hong Kong International Airport uses a "digital twin" built on Unity to simulate changes in passenger volume
    He doesn't share many references or links with more details. I'd love to hear from anyone if they have more examples of game engines being used for non-gaming use cases like these. Or any links or other information to share related to this topic. https://twitter.com/aaronzlewis/status/1291889682788253696
    robenkleene
    i
    +3
    17 replies
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  • Robert Butler

    Robert Butler

    2 years ago
    I just stumbled across this article. It left me feeling like I stumbled onto something very profound. It's not directly related to coding, but this article gets at the very core of what this community is about if we are honest. I know my 16-bit processor, assembly language and ultimately the high level language I'm trying to build are me trying to say something, to be consulted about the future of coding. https://ftrain.com/wwic
    Robert Butler
    Kartik Agaram
    +2
    7 replies
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  • g

    Garth Goldwater

    2 years ago
    https://twitter.com/workingdog_/status/1292940516548640774?s=21 this thread, i think, points to what we lose when our systems and databases aren’t modifiable by everyday users. it’s about the diversity of human experience, and a love of pen and paper, but i think the most important thing to note about the way pen and paper gets talked about here is that the people filling out the forms are free to scratch things out and file reasonable requests and modify things as really existing people and events shake up the ontologies of the processes they are tasked with using
    g
    Kartik Agaram
    +1
    3 replies
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