• m

    Matei Adriel

    2 years ago
    Hey guys, question for everyone who's making a desktop visual lang: what do you use for rendering and why?
    m
    c
    +9
    102 replies
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  • Mariano Guerra

    Mariano Guerra

    2 years ago
    How does the future of coding handles missing/mixed data like undefined, null or values that change type over time?
    Mariano Guerra
    Orion Reed
    +7
    53 replies
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  • Steve

    Steve

    2 years ago

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4Ej_3NKA3pk

    Some nice thoughts in here
    Steve
    opeispo
    +1
    8 replies
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  • p

    Pine Wu

    2 years ago
    Experimenting with podcast. Would love to learn what you think about it: https://foc-new-podcast-player.netlify.app. Asking since I converted Ep 31 with my tool, and the community survey reveals a high concentration of podcast-transcript readers. Endgoal: to have a text format similar to SRT/WebVTT, but allow HTML content. Have a CLI or website to convert audio + text to this interactive app. Basic features: - Mapping between HTML/audio, vertical-distance/audio-time. - Click audio progress bar to find corresponding HTML - Click HTML to jump to audio position - Click HTML to get a sharable URL-with-hash I edited first few paragraphs to include
    <a>
    , but you can put any HTML there, including
    <img>
    etc. All HTML can be then linked against audio. Some things I like: - Easily talk about visual things with
    <img>
    - Reference without having to explain with
    <a>
    - You can read-listen (Cmd+F -> Play) - Each piece of audio dialogue is referenceable I noticed some common shortcomings in podcasts: - can't talk about visual matters - linerality (as you can't easily reference) I think these limitations exclude certain topics and ways-of-talking. I'm making a podcast myself. Being aware of these shortcomings, I first made this tool/presentation before recording my podcast. My questions are: - Would you like to listen to such podcasts? - In what way would you listen to them differently?
    p
    Ryan King
    +5
    14 replies
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  • m

    Marcin Ignac

    2 years ago
    I've just encountered this old thread on no-code and open-source in the newsletter and i wonder if anyone has thoughts on monetisation based on content creation similar to how assets and learning materials used in e.g. 3d graphics industry https://futureofcoding.slack.com/archives/C5T9GPWFL/p1591214873399000
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    g
    5 replies
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  • Maeliza

    Maeliza

    2 years ago
    Hello folks, with @Shubhadeep Roychowdhury we are happy to release the latest version of tree-hugger library : https://github.com/autosoft-dev/tree-hugger 🏆 With a single API call, tree-hugger enables you to mine source code accross 5 languages: • Python, • PHP, • Java, • JavaScript, • C++🔥 Build your own dataset of code in seconds (e.g. Code Search Net, Py150...) We are looking for feedbacks on it, feel free to shoot any issues
    Maeliza
    1 replies
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  • Orion Reed

    Orion Reed

    2 years ago
    What are some essential talks about the future of coding? Talks that ask questions like what could the future look like? Why is it important that it’s different? Why should we all care? What is possible? What is so wrong with computing today? Playlists or links to similar conversations are okay here too if you think it fits the criteria.
    Orion Reed
    g
    +4
    8 replies
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  • w

    Will

    2 years ago
    I feel like I’m getting old and crotchety. Every time I go back and watch the canon of FoC videos, I more and more disagree with statements of the form: If only everyone had followed this good old idea, everything would be great by now! Examples:- Alan Kay in “The Computer Revolution Hasn’t Happened Yet” says HTML and browser wars are stupid because we should be shipping the renderer with the file itself. - Bret Victor in “The Future of Programming” says it’s crazy that we’re programming in text files because Smalltalk had a function-centered IDE. But I feel these examples always miss some important context. Social context, technical context, economic context. Shipping a rendering engine with an HTML file would be a technical nightmare. Programming still happens in text files because text files are an incredibly durable, universal format that can be passed around to dozens of auxiliary tools (e.g. code review -- see why everybody hates collaborating on Jupyter). These talks are still obviously insightful, both for reminding us of computing history, and pointing out important issues in the status quo. But I’m always extremely skeptical when they don’t address why programming became the way it is. I have yet to see a talk that grapples with the messy reality of the world, how we have to daily work with huge systems coded by thousands of people who we barely trust. Gone are the days where 10 smart people at PARC can hack together an OS themselves with absolutely no concerns for security, accessibility, backwards-compatibility, … I would love to see more visions for FoC that take these realities into account.
    w
    t
    +9
    11 replies
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  • Kartik Agaram

    Kartik Agaram

    2 years ago
    My personal discipline is to always phrase imperatives as trade-offs:* You should be tithing some of your time to understanding your computer. It's not enough to ask why others have not made it easier for you to understand your computer. * You should be willing to put up with klunkier interfaces in exchange for nicer implementation properties. (Eat your vegetables.) Sticking with text mode is an extreme form of this, hopefully I can break out of that in time. * You should be willing to take on some complexity in selecting forks of software to depend on, in exchange for a simpler computing stack once you've added them. * You should be willing to give up efficiency for safety. Memory leaks are ok if they avoid memory corruption. I think speaking in trade-offs is a major level-up in discourse over "why don't we have this yet?" Relevant is the Thiel question: "What important truth do very few people agree with you on?" Most answers turn out to be not very iconoclastic at all, because they aren't phrased as trade-offs. It's great that you want world peace. What do you think is worth giving up for it? So, what important but iconoclastic trade-off do you believe in? 🙂
    Kartik Agaram
    i
    +5
    12 replies
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  • Konrad Hinsen

    Konrad Hinsen

    2 years ago
    A story currently much debated in biology: Scientists rename human genes to stop Microsoft Excel from misreading them as dates The problem of Excel converting some gene names to dates (example: MARCH1) has been discussed for a while already. Biologists had adopted Excel believing it to be a general-purpose computational tool, but then discovered that Microsoft intended it to be a domain-specific tool for business data, without insisting much on that detail in their communication with the public. Several published genome studies already contained mistakes. So... what to do? The feature cannot be turned off, Microsoft didn't really care because biologists are not their main customer base, and re-training biologists around the world to use another tool wasn't doable. So they decided to change the names of the genes! This isn't an easy decision, and it will be costly as well, adding complexity to future bioinformatics software and confusion among biologists.
    Konrad Hinsen
    shalabh
    +5
    14 replies
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