• Nick Smith

    Nick Smith

    2 years ago
    I think the above question is better split into two, so here's a separate prompt: What is the difference between an exclusive data bucket and a tag? Is one inferior to the other? How do you tell them apart, behaviourally? (My definition of "bucket" here means simply an exclusive location that a datum is considered to "live" within, whereas a "tag" is not a residence. Example of buckets: the "folders" of a hierarchical file system. Example of tags: the labels placed upon Github issues or the #hashtags of social media posts.)
    Nick Smith
    Chris Knott
    +4
    17 replies
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  • Stefan

    Stefan

    2 years ago
    I think some of you here will enjoy this podcast by Ryan Singer of Basecamp, author of Shape Up:https://synthetic.transistor.fm/
    Stefan
    1 replies
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  • Joe Nash

    Joe Nash

    2 years ago
    I just put out the latest Enso devblog:https://medium.com/@enso_org/enso-dev-blog-friday-17th-july-702456f6f94 This one’s got some neat stuff in it, including first look at the standard library (in textual Enso, not yet in visual), and the colour-by-type for ports and edges that may be familiar to users of Luna 1.x.
    Joe Nash
    2 replies
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  • opeispo

    opeispo

    2 years ago
    What are the axes on which different programming languages differ? So far, I have evaluation - eager or lazy abstraction mechanisms - classes, modules etc types - static, dynamic, strongly, weakly (I know first 2 and last 2 are different categories🙂) syntax primitives What else?
    opeispo
    Orion Reed
    +6
    17 replies
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  • Daniel Garcia

    Daniel Garcia

    2 years ago
    I think that many companies are standardizing a workflow, that before writing any code you need to write a
    design document
    with the options on how to solve a problem and the chosen solution. A lot of times this document has the code changes required by any of the solution options. To me the options that we didn't end up following seem as valuable as the chosen option, and those options should also be captured in code. A really easy way could be in separate branches, but then we loose visibility of them. Is anybody familiar with source control software or with patterns to work with source control that also keeps tracks of options considered but not followed at the end?
    Daniel Garcia
    Martin
    +2
    11 replies
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  • Ryan King

    Ryan King

    2 years ago
    I was thinking in an earlier thread how flash animation might be a good introduction to programming, and a lot of you here are working ways to democratise / make programming easier. So perhaps understanding how people learnt to program could offer insights into how to teach people to program and make programming in general less complex. So I'm curious, how did you learn to program?
    Ryan King
    Ray Imber
    +12
    22 replies
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  • Orion Reed

    Orion Reed

    2 years ago
    I’d like to talk a little about capitalism (I know I know please don’t leave!). Not politics, not an “Uh it sucks!” conversation, but a serious discussion that’s highly relevant to the future of coding. This is a hard topic to discuss with the same rigour as computer science or PL design but I think it is one of the most important topics for this community to tackle. To help bring some rigour to this conversation I’d like to bring up some incredibly important academic work which you can check out should you want to. Surveillance Capitalism and Platform Capitalism (these models aren’t in competition) are two of the best and most current models of economics, and could not exist without computing. They are both worthy of your time and have lots of explanatory and predictive power. They also point to a very important point for us: The technical challenge alone will not fix computing, nor will design. It’s not as simple as changing the incentives for companies or decentralising software, and not as straightforward as improving coding by a few orders of magnitude. So, if we as a community want to change coding forever and for good, we must also understand the societal, political and economic context we exist in. I’d love to hear thoughts and discuss this but want to guide this conversation away from some pitfalls and towards productive conversation. Things we don’t need to discuss: • Personal opinions on wether capitalism sucks or not • Opinions on social media or corporate giants and their many problems or evils • The kind of discussions and critiques we have again and again all over social media around capitalism, Web 2.0, platforms, giant tech companies, etcetera. Some things this community could benefit from discussing: • Concrete research and resources to learn more, inform ourselves and each other. • Ways in which we can facilitate true systemic change through our work here. • Questions that we think are worth exploring • Ways for this community to keep growing its understanding of economic context, the complex structures behind them, and improve our collective reasoning and decision making.
    Orion Reed
    Tim Lipp
    +6
    66 replies
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  • c

    Chris G

    2 years ago
  • s

    S.M Mukarram Nainar

    2 years ago
    s
    g
    2 replies
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  • Scott Anderson

    Scott Anderson

    2 years ago