• s

    S.M Mukarram Nainar

    2 years ago
    What do people here think about t-expressions?https://srfi.schemers.org/srfi-110/srfi-110.html @Kartik Agaram I noticed your name in the acknowledgements, do you have any comments?
    s
    Kartik Agaram
    +4
    33 replies
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  • j

    jamii

    2 years ago
    http://acko.net/blog/software-development-as-advanced-damage-control/
    When you look at code from a data-centric view, a lot of things start to look like stale or inconsistent data problems. I don't like using the word "cache" for this because it focuses on the negative, the absence of fresh input. The real issue is data dependencies, which are connections that must be maintained in order to present a cohesive view and cohesive behavior, derived from a changing input model.
    j
    k
    +2
    4 replies
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  • z

    Zubairq

    2 years ago
    What do people here think of Deno?
    z
    i
    +1
    4 replies
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  • k

    korede

    2 years ago
    https://twitter.com/ocornut/status/1266416887082221568 that last note seems really crucial. i feel like programming tools developers have a ton to learn from game engine people
    k
    g
    2 replies
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  • Nick Smith

    Nick Smith

    2 years ago
    Has anyone thought about, implemented, or encountered higher-level abstractions of ALUs? a.k.a. the part of hardware where actual computations are performed (as opposed to the miles of hardware dedicated to control flow management). Almost every programming language has an ALU abstraction based upon fixed-width chunks of binary digits (32 or 64-wide), arithmetic operations (interpreting the chunks as integers or IEEE floats), and bitwise and bitshift operations. Those fixed-width chunks are grouped into "allocations", which are either larger fixed-width containers (structs etc) or dynamically-sized arrays. Recently I've been thinking about a "clean slate" abstraction that still exposes the basic operations that ALUs are good at (integer arithmetic and bit manipulations) but without the fixed-width chunk limitations. Fixed-width chunks are purely a hardware design limitation and have no inherent value to a programmer's mental model; they just add complexity to data modelling. What DOES have value is the notion of a dynamically-sized bit sequence that can be manipulated via splicing operations (take, drop, insert, replace) that generalize bit shifts, bitwise operations (the same old &,|,^ operations), and the familiar arithmetic operations (add, sub, mul, div...). This is a natural foundation for arbitrary-size integers and sequences, but also for general computations that want an efficient mapping to hardware capabilities. I want to take an ALU abstraction like this and build my way-out-there logic programming environment on top of it, so that you still have a conceptual bridge to hardware, and thus you can still reason about the efficiency of basic operations and use them to create efficient user-defined data types.
    Nick Smith
    Edward de Jong / Beads Project
    +3
    31 replies
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  • Maeliza

    Maeliza

    2 years ago
    Our Future of Coding project is taking shape 🤩 We are building Machine Learning Model that can learn how to code 🏆 With @Shubhadeep Roychowdhury we are excited to release codeBERT. It's a Masked Language Model trained over Python source code thanks to Hugging Face. 🕹️ You can easily load the model and its weights (code below)
    from transformers import *
    tokenizer = AutoTokenizer.from_pretrained("codistai/codeBERT-small-v2")model = AutoModelWithLMHead.from_pretrained("codistai/codeBERT-small-v2")
    📈 Example of the results are in the thread below 📚 Full tutorial on how to load and fine-tune the model for downstream tasks is coming!
    Maeliza
    alltom
    3 replies
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  • s

    Steve Dekorte

    2 years ago
    If you feel (as I’m guessing most of us here do) that software development hasn’t progressed very much in the last several decades, can you share any thoughts/theories you might have on why that has happened?
    s
    i
    +8
    25 replies
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  • i

    Ivan Reese

    2 years ago
    Because I think it's going to devolve… if you instead want to share thoughts about how software dev has made good progress in the past few decades, join my thread.
    i
    tbabb
    +4
    19 replies
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  • v

    vitorio

    2 years ago
    Anyone familiar with the work Synthetic Minds is doing? They've got an HN jobs post:
    Synthetic Minds is building program synthesizers, i.e., automation that can write code. We have a working prototype in stealth and are currently in the process of doing user studies.
    Their site and Twitter look like it's about automated generation of smart contracts, and they held a summit on program synthesis last fall? https://synthetic-minds.com/
    v
    Chet Corcos
    2 replies
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  • t

    Tem (optemization.com)

    2 years ago
    So I have my consulting website on Notion made public with a tool called super.so…today, I got an email from a genuinely helpful person who alerted me that I had my projects/todos data available publicly. I told him it was on purpose for transparency sake (idk if its helpful for biz but that’s a separate conversation). He sends:
    "As a DBA (database architect) and developer for 23+ years, managing million dollar+ projects, I wouldn't use Notion in this public way. It's possible to run into sensitive info issues down the road when you forget to lock things down. You can't scale and maintain security because Notion simply doesn't have the features to provide scalable security for public facing Pages. I would instead create a fake project that you can demo and make public. And since the personal level is now free with unlimited blocks, you could create a separate "Demo" workspace without fear of ever showing sensitive data or running into block limits.
    
    Best of luck... I'm seeing an increasing problem in the Notion community with non-programmers and those with little or no real-world Project Management or database experience setting up shop as Notion Experts. We were building database-backed websites in 1996-7 and by the early 2000's most of our jobs for large companies and State agencies and governments consisted of cleaning up the messes the early "web designers" created ... I fear we're seeing a similar situation with Notion and in 1-3 years there are going to be clients who have unusable systems that will have to be rebuilt in order to scale and handle new functionality..."
    I feel like this could be a good discussion. What are your thoughts?
    t
    w
    +5
    8 replies
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