• shalabh

    shalabh

    2 years ago
  • w

    Will

    2 years ago
    The nocode (lowcode?) wars continue: https://www.useparagon.com/
    w
    Edward de Jong / Beads Project
    +3
    8 replies
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  • j

    Julius

    2 years ago
    Looks like lynx took down their What page with gifs, anyone have an archive of the page lynxtool.com/What.html? Not on way back machine (cc @Ivan Reese)
    j
    i
    +2
    4 replies
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  • Max Krieger

    Max Krieger

    2 years ago
    Really good read on language design and community management. Sometimes the principled design approach takes a toll on everyone when it's iterative https://lukeplant.me.uk/blog/posts/why-im-leaving-elm/
    Max Krieger
    d
    +4
    24 replies
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  • i

    Ivan Reese

    2 years ago
    Help me fill in this spectrum of models of computation. • [Mechanical — designed to be built] • • Analytical Engine • Turing Machine • von Neumann • Rule 110 • Lambda Calculus • SKI Combinator Calculus • • [Theoretical — difficult, but of course possible, to make a physical machine for] Are these in the correct order? What other models exist that I should add here, and where should they go?
    i
    Mariano Guerra
    +6
    25 replies
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  • Konrad Hinsen

    Konrad Hinsen

    2 years ago
    Fixed-point is often a good alternative, but rarely well supported in languages. But there are important cases where it fails, and it's those you need to look at. Example: Generate random points in a sphere or a square, and sum 1/d^2 over all pairs of points, where d is the distance between the points in a pair. That's a cartoon version of computing gravitational or electrostatic interactions in physics. 1/d^2 is very large for short distances but very small for long ones, which however make up the majority of pairs. Doing this with rationals is prohibitively expensive.
    Konrad Hinsen
    Nick Smith
    +5
    18 replies
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  • Mariano Guerra

    Mariano Guerra

    2 years ago
    Many languages have implementations of this http://speleotrove.com/decimal/decarith.html for example python https://docs.python.org/3.8/library/decimal.html
    Mariano Guerra
    Nick Smith
    +1
    7 replies
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  • Kartik Agaram

    Kartik Agaram

    2 years ago
    This morning I find myself (re?)reading the documentation on the command language for the Sam editor from Plan9: http://doc.cat-v.org/bell_labs/sam_lang_tutorial/sam_tut.pdf It's interesting to think of these command languages from the 70's as a necessarily linguistic way to describe gestural operations, purely because of the technical limitations of the time. For example, I think editors with multiple cursors may find something to crib from Sam.
    Kartik Agaram
    1 replies
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  • d

    Doug Moen

    2 years ago
    Fixed point is rubbish for a general purpose language. It has its place, especially on embedded processors with no floating point hardware, but in general you get worse numeric results, so you have to be much more careful in designing your code than you do with floating point. Rational arithmetic is so crazy expensive in both time and space that numerically intensive algorithms can become infeasible, thus forcing users to rewrite their programs in another language that supports floating point. There are many languages where computations don't have a total ordering: any purely functional language that uses data parallelism for performance (eg, using GPU hardware) has this characteristic. The serious ones used for real work use floating point. For example, Tensor Flow. There is actually no way to design a number system for a programming language that is "perfect". There are only engineering tradeoffs. For a general purpose language, floating point represents a local optimum that is hard to beat.
    d
    Kartik Agaram
    +3
    18 replies
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  • Scott Anderson

    Scott Anderson

    2 years ago
    Pretty relevant for this community https://www.gwern.net/Turing-complete
    Scott Anderson
    d
    5 replies
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