• Edward de Jong / Beads Project

    Edward de Jong / Beads Project

    2 years ago
    The independent hodgepodge of isolated apps allows function to evolve without breaking other products. The problem with jack of all trades apps like Framework and others was that it is hard to satisfy particular markets with one generic product without bloat. Some people decry variety, but variety is necessary to satisfy all the different needs. Dynabook was a fantasy born of some theory that a single structure would be generally useful. Apple created the Applescript (now called Automator) that allowed you to use Apple Events and communicate between applications. Some older apps were entirely scriptable, but nowadays hardly anyone uses it. There just isn't that much cross communication between apps that makes sense. After all, each project has its own data structures which is really what isolates them; many programs don't agree on how to store numbers, which is a rather major problem if you are talking about intra-program communication.
    Edward de Jong / Beads Project
    Jared Windover
    +6
    13 replies
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  • Scott Anderson

    Scott Anderson

    2 years ago
    Our Machinery posted about their approach to UI and tools in their new engine (https://ourmachinery.com/writing-tools-faster.html), it was meant to be a GDC presentation but... coronavirus
    Scott Anderson
    Edward de Jong / Beads Project
    +2
    5 replies
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  • c

    Chris G

    2 years ago
    c
    shalabh
    +2
    5 replies
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  • b

    Brent

    2 years ago
    Hi all, I would be interested to hear thoughts on the current state of educational environments for programming skills and paradigms.  I'm wondering if with a somewhat enhanced approach to sharing knowledge in our domain - certain things could be learnt (far?) more efficiently. Stretch goal would be to be learn the interesting parts of the go lang compiler in the morning, and compare their design decisions and trade offs to the internals of the dotty compiler in the afternoon.  To me; its another angle on "accidental complexity." There certainly are a number of hard bits in building and understanding software; but, whenever I start to get my head somewhat around a code set; I generally feel that the interesting / insightful / useful bits of the solution are far too buried in boilerplate and various other forms of noise. I think the "learning" angle is a useful perspective to keep in mind. I do mainly mean it in the read a textbook / blog post, watch a youtube video, attend a (virtual) conference, go to coding bootcamp / university, onboard a new joiner to your team kinda way. But; I also feel that "learning" is pretty much all we are every trying to do. "Learn" how to implement this Rest API and make it slightly more testable than our last attempt. "Learn" what the root cause of this bug taking down our entire production platform is etc. Of course; all thoughts and comments welcome - I would be interested to hear peoples views on points such as- what events stand out as important learning points in your path to technical enlightenment? - what approaches have been used to "get up to speed" in order to contribute to open source software? Perhaps from the "how did you learn enough stuff to be useful" perspective - how well (or not) have you seen the "living" knowledge of a code-set be managed in secular projects? - Is Udemy all we should hope for; or could we build better environments within which to have our discussions?
    b
    Srini K
    +2
    18 replies
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  • karki

    karki

    2 years ago
    The Cambridge Handbook of Computing Education Research https://www.cambridge.org/core/books/cambridge-handbook-of-computing-education-research/F8CFAF7B81A8F6BF5C663412BA0A943D
    This Handbook describes the extent and shape of computing education research today. Over fifty leading researchers from academia and industry (including Google and Microsoft) have contributed chapters that together define and expand the evidence base. The foundational chapters set the field in context, articulate expertise from key disciplines, and form a practical guide for new researchers. They address what can be learned empirically, methodologically and theoretically from each area. The topic chapters explore issues that are of current interest, why they matter, and what is already known. They include discussion of motivational context, implications for practice, and open questions which might suggest future research. The authors provide an authoritative introduction to the field which is essential reading for policy makers, as well as both new and established researchers.
    karki
    1 replies
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  • karki

    karki

    2 years ago
    First time I’ve heard of “Malleable Systems”. From what I could gather it refers to systems that permit end user programmability / heavy customisability
    karki
    ogadaki
    +8
    20 replies
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  • Michael Mamic

    Michael Mamic

    2 years ago
    I've been researching formal logic and came across Begriffsschrift, a book by Gottlob Frege which details what I would consider the first programming language in history. It was published in 1879 yet many of the ideas outlined in its premise remind me of what this community is trying to accomplish. The actual notation that this book describes is not too relevant but I would encourage you to read the four page premise that Frege wrote. Note that this comes after the translator's note, which is the first thing in the PDF. PDF is here.
    Michael Mamic
    d
    +1
    9 replies
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  • Scott Anderson

    Scott Anderson

    2 years ago
  • Mariano Guerra

    Mariano Guerra

    2 years ago
    I received the newsletter with corrupted emojis, am I the only one? #ThePresentOfCoding
    Mariano Guerra
    i
    +1
    6 replies
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  • Mariano Guerra

    Mariano Guerra

    2 years ago