• Mariano Guerra

    Mariano Guerra

    2 years ago
    https://twobithistory.org/2018/05/27/semantic-web.html
    The web we have today is slowly becoming a glorified app store, just the easiest way among many to download software that communicates with distant servers using closed protocols and schemas, making it functionally identical to the software ecosystem that existed before the web. How did we get here? If the effort to build a Semantic Web had succeeded, would the web have looked different today? Or have there been so many forces working against a decentralized web for so long that the Semantic Web was always going to be stillborn?
    Mariano Guerra
    Konrad Hinsen
    +5
    11 replies
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  • ogadaki

    ogadaki

    2 years ago
    Very interesting blog post about offline first collaborative editing of tree structures, as it is done at Figma.https://www.figma.com/blog/how-figmas-multiplayer-technology-works/
    ogadaki
    Edward de Jong / Beads Project
    7 replies
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  • Edward de Jong / Beads Project

    Edward de Jong / Beads Project

    2 years ago
    Ah, i found the original product that predates or at the least is at the same time as JS, it was called FutureSplash Animator (1993) https://weekly-geekly.github.io/articles/148212/index.html This was all owned by Macromedia at the time. Macromedia had Freehand (from Altsys), and Fontographer, and some other great products. Adobe bought all of these firms and unfortunately these tool pioneers are ignored.
    Edward de Jong / Beads Project
    1 replies
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  • Nick Smith

    Nick Smith

    2 years ago
    A completely unrelated question: Every programming language has a notion of "dependencies" between data, e.g. the between the variables (or functions) of a program. Understanding this dependency graph is important: it helps you determine the flow of data through your program. Consequently, it's problematic if every value is accessible from everywhere. Programming languages usually solve this with a notion called scope. Scopes are typically nested. Scopes may take the form of "modules" or "blocks". It's my understanding that organising data into scopes is a mere approximation to expressing the true dependency graph of a program's data (which can be a DAG or a cyclic graph, not just a tree). It's easy to see the extent of a value hidden in a block, but it's not possible to show that a value is referenced in precisely two blocks. Similarly, it's easy to make values internal to a module, but PLs don't have a built-in way to visualise how the imports and exports of modules are interconnected (there are some external tools for visualising this). My question is: has anyone seen some good ways of representing data dependencies? Something better than a boxes-and-arrows visualisation?
    Nick Smith
    Duncan Cragg
    +6
    30 replies
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  • Nick Smith

    Nick Smith

    2 years ago
    Scope obviously has another utility: implementation hiding. I wonder if organising dependencies is just a side-effect of that use-case?
    Nick Smith
    ibdknox
    6 replies
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  • d

    Doug Moen

    2 years ago
    @Edward de Jong / Beads Project "Javascript is way more directly related to Actionscript 2 and its predecessors than Self."
    The timing is wrong for this. Javascript was released in 1995. Actionscript 1.0 was released in 2000, the first version to support OOP, and it copied its object model (prototype based inheritance) from Javascript. Actionscript 2.0 was released 2003 and introduced class-based inheritance. Javascript was designed by Brendan Eich. The language was originally codenamed Mocha, later LiveScript, and the initial idea was "Scheme for the browser". However, Netscape had entered a partnership with Sun to include Java in the browser, and this led to a new requirement from management that LiveScript should be a companion to Java. So it was renamed Javascript and given a C-like syntax. Brendan Eich himself describes Javascript as "a quickie love-child of C and Self" (from his blog: https://brendaneich.com/2008/04/popularity/). Why was Javascript derived from Self? The designers of Self were now working for Sun, and the Sun/Netscape partnership may explain how Self became the direct ancestor of Javascript (I'm speculating on this point). Javascript could not use Self syntax, of course, due to the management requirement for a C-like syntax, hence the need to innovate and create a hybrid language.
    d
    Nick Smith
    +2
    4 replies
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  • Edward de Jong / Beads Project

    Edward de Jong / Beads Project

    2 years ago
    VideoWorks's (1985) sequel, Macromedia director 3 (1993), must have been known to Brendan; they were very popular products., and I believe the FutureSplash animator had a language too. If someone bothered to track down these old products and study them, i am sure you would find elements there. The fantasy that Brendan created a new language from scratch in two weeks is myth. Programming languages exist in an evolution of concepts that inevitably go back to foundational designs, with relatively small amounts added each time. It is extremely rare to see a wholly new language like FORTH was.
    Edward de Jong / Beads Project
    1 replies
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  • karki

    karki

    2 years ago
    Not sure if this has been shared here before, but found this interesting resource - GUI gallery guidebook.https://guidebookgallery.org/ Curated bunch of videos, books, GUIs, articles, etc. that explore the history and evolution of various kinds of user interfaces!
    karki
    1 replies
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  • robenkleene

    robenkleene

    2 years ago
    There's a only a bit on programming here, but I think the appeal of this essay will still be broad with this group. What are some of the most promising directions right now for "transformative tools for thought"? Along the lines of these examples the authors gave: "Illustrator, Google Search, Twitter, Slack, Google Docs, programmer tools" https://numinous.productions/ttft/
    robenkleene
    Kartik Agaram
    +3
    17 replies
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  • i

    Ivan Reese

    2 years ago
    <!everyone> — I'd like to present to you the first ever Future of Coding Community Survey. Link below, supplemental notes in the following thread. ➡️ https://forms.gle/cBzxD7CQyoQxNGyw8 ⬅️ Thank you for taking the time to fill it out, giving us helpful data for deciding what new things to do for the community in the coming year.
    i
    Duncan Cragg
    +7
    27 replies
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