• w

    Wil Chung

    2 years ago
    Also, as a separate question, I was thinking of getting myself something for Black Friday. Either the Little Schemer or the Little Typer. Which would you recommend if you’ve read either?
    w
    comma
    2 replies
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  • Mariano Guerra

    Mariano Guerra

    2 years ago
    if your language had a link type, equality would be over the url? the text? both?
    Mariano Guerra
    i
    +4
    14 replies
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  • Pezo - Zoltan Peto

    Pezo - Zoltan Peto

    2 years ago
    (Unavoidable) shared mutable state marks cooperating objects + one’s data depends on the other’s (in time) for runtime branching. Could not we explicitly restrict the access of (lets say 2) objects (1-1 methods) in time - relative to one other? We could listen to all the relevant(!) messages to validate the access of objects for the shared state. The dev should enumerate 2 things (for each accessing method per mutable state): • All the valid sequences of messages which indicate access is granted for the method. “Synced.” • All the valid sequences of messages which indicate access is denied for the method. “Sync needed.” (Modelled with Finite Automatons) We should be also be able to determine (generate) all the relevant(!) sequences of messages (per state per accessing method) - and check if something is left out. If so, the system prompts us and we must fill put the remaining cases to “granted”/“denied”. (The general idea is to always EXPLICITLY enumerate when to do and when NOT to do something so we can later check with exhaustive search.) By relevant messages and relevant sequences of messages I mean those which by cascading through in the system (calls) might have any chance to effect the access of the method. Only if there are too many branches (combinatorial explosion) shall we narrow EXPLICITLY the cases we think behave the same. (By defining more Finite Automatons). I have this idea for a long time now and I come back to it over and over again. Seems really simple, but did not find anything like that yet. The closest findings are something like TLA+ and Temporal Logic (especially from the complexity of CTL), but to me this process seems quite good and I am not sure why it does not exists yet. @Kartik Agaram @Prathyush
    Pezo - Zoltan Peto
    Kartik Agaram
    +3
    14 replies
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  • p

    Pine Wu

    2 years ago
    While this might be obvious to you all, but today while reading history it occurred to me that the name DynamicLand is a combination of Alan Kay's "Personal Dynamic Media" and Seymour Papert's "Mathland".
    p
    Cole
    +3
    5 replies
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  • Wouter

    Wouter

    2 years ago
    Angelo Pesce on hackability should appeal to many here: http://c0de517e.blogspot.com/2019/12/is-true-hacking-dead-what-we-lost.html
    Wouter
    Edward de Jong / Beads Project
    +6
    20 replies
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  • y

    yaxu

    2 years ago
    perhaps even, the more successful they are, the less they're considered worthy of being called programming at all (spreadsheets, scripting, patching)
    y
    Konrad Hinsen
    +6
    121 replies
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  • d

    Dan Swirsky

    2 years ago
    I have never understood whether and how live programming could be applied to programming a live-action game or an application that monitors and controls a manufacturing process. Is live programming only applicable to a well-defined subset of applications?
    d
    Dan Cook
    +1
    3 replies
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  • d

    Dan Swirsky

    2 years ago
    What I mean is, I have only ever seen examples like

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YLrdhFEAiqo

    where visual elements are manipulated. What I'd like to see is a demo of what this would look like when programming a simple, live action game. Can one live-program a moving flappy bird against a moving background? Does one need to hit the space bar while doing this in order to prevent flappy from crashing?
    d
    1 replies
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  • Don Abrams

    Don Abrams

    2 years ago
    Oh hey, just ran across an update to livecv (including a rename to livekeys) that looks future-of-coding-ey and it’s open source:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZPt5KSy1wh0

    https://github.com/live-keys/livekeys
    Don Abrams
    g
    2 replies
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  • d

    Drewverlee

    2 years ago
    This is a fairly broad question, so I'm open to any level of response. Does anyone have any recommendations on how to leverage software to address climate change issues? I would be happy with links to organisations or causes you trust.
    d
    g
    +2
    4 replies
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