• mk

    mk

    2 years ago
    anyone here coming to OOPSLA/Splash and plan to attend LIVE? I'm a bit confused if registration is just included in the normal wednesday ticket
    mk
    jonathoda
    5 replies
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  • s

    Steve Dekorte

    2 years ago
    Would a demos channel where people can post their latest demo videos be helpful?
    s
    alltom
    +1
    7 replies
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  • stevekrouse

    stevekrouse

    2 years ago
    <!everyone> I've decided that what this community needs to really take off is just a little more resources. To this end, I'm raising $20M to fund this community. This is no joke. I asked Alan how much we need for the real computer revolution and that's what he said. Let's go do it!
    stevekrouse
    s
    +31
    255 replies
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  • g

    Garth Goldwater

    2 years ago
    half-baked thought: for programming languages, the environment (in the lisp sense: “which variables are in scope and what are their values”) is really just a poorly constructed database we blindly query against by typing symbols and seeing what they resolve to (or if they resolve to anything). Most (all?) programming activity can be boiled down to: 1. adding a key/value to the database (eg by defining a function or variable) 2. finding a value (calling a function, referencing a variable) 3. doing some transformation with the value, usually involving 1 or 2 to find instructions for the work to be done (eg, resolving the symbol ‘+’) 4. querying a location on the OS and receiving or sending data to it (stdin/stdout etc) simplifying the UX (especially with feedback) on this would do a whole lot to make programming better. especially if we specialized a structure editor to understand not merely “here’s a semantically valid edit” but “here’s the environment before and after this change”
    g
    Mariano Guerra
    +6
    35 replies
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  • Felix Kohlgrüber

    Felix Kohlgrüber

    2 years ago
    I'm pretty sure we've had Observable (https://observablehq.com) on this Slack before (at least I hope so), but I want to bring it up again. It's a js-based live computational notebook similar to jupyter notebooks, but with automatic recalculation (like spreadsheets). Using js as the programming language means that computations can run client-side, with makes it trivial to get started and publish notebooks. I've created a medium-sized notebook over the last two days (https://observablehq.com/@fkohlgrueber/warming-stripes) and really liked it. Some things are a little weird, but it works surprisingly well even though it is built on top of js (which was never designed for this kind of execution model). What do you think about this project? Is this a good step towards end-user-programming?
    Felix Kohlgrüber
    g
    +4
    7 replies
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  • g

    Garth Goldwater

    2 years ago
    was actually referencing this video in my previous thread and was just reminded of how ahead of its time the self programming environment was:

    https://youtu.be/5Jhi5yN9S1o

    g
    alltom
    +3
    14 replies
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  • w

    Wil Chung

    2 years ago
    PG announced his second Lisp variant: Bel. http://paulgraham.com/bel.html He’s taking an axiomatic approach to Lisp, as described here: https://sep.yimg.com/ty/cdn/paulgraham/bellanguage.txt?t=1570888282&amp;
    w
    Dan Cook
    +9
    37 replies
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  • i

    Ivan Reese

    2 years ago
    Jonathan Blow showed up in the comments on the HN Bel post with some excellent thought-clarifying questions: https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=21237636
    i
    Kartik Agaram
    +7
    29 replies
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  • Mariano Guerra

    Mariano Guerra

    2 years ago
    can it be generalized to "if someone needs an improvement on dimension X, then they will look around and find it [on their current tool]"?
    Mariano Guerra
    Gary Trakhman
    +2
    11 replies
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  • Konrad Hinsen

    Konrad Hinsen

    2 years ago
    Pypy is a drop-in replacement only for a pure Python codebase. Add C modules (which most big Python codebases use at some point), and the transition to pypy becomes a lot harder Another issue, at least for me, is complexity. I have way more trust in the CPython codebase, written and inspected by hundreds of competent programmers over time, than in the complex code generation machinery behind pypy. I have found and fixed bugs in CPython, but if anything goes wrong when using pypy, I wouldn't even know how to start debugging it.
    Konrad Hinsen
    1 replies
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