• Katyaso

    Katyaso

    3 years ago
    Here is an idea explaining the algorithm for linked list. Group of people, a robe in a length of exactly 20 feet. The road. The tree at the end of the road. How can someone from the group to go towards the tree and stop exactly 20 feet from it? Exercise at first might have an idea to go all away to the tree, place the robe there that measure the distance and the other end of the road will be the place to stop. Modification for more optimal decision would be two people holding a robe and walking towards the tree with a robe between them. Once the leading person gets to the tree, the one behind is standing where we wanted to be. Just came to me as possible way to explain. So not know how useful it is but things like that can be taught to children at early age.
    Katyaso
    w
    2 replies
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  • Kartik Agaram

    Kartik Agaram

    3 years ago
    https://github.com/Bogdan-Lyashenko/codecrumbs/blob/master/README.md
    Have you ever got lost in a big or unknown codebase? This tool will help you to solve that. Also, it will increase your development speed and give more knowledge about your application architecture.
    How it works: You run codecrumbs command for a codebase, it analyzes source code and builds its visual representation. Write down a codecrumb-comment and codebase state will be reflected by visual client in browser on the fly.
    Kartik Agaram
    s
    +1
    8 replies
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  • Vladimir Gordeev

    Vladimir Gordeev

    3 years ago
    When you design a programming language it's important to ensure that it is convenient. Seems like the best way to do it is to write a program in this imaginary language. What are good problems to try out with this imaginary language? * a backend for blog web app, * a backend for webchat with websockets any other suggestions?
    Vladimir Gordeev
    m
    +7
    34 replies
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  • Mariano Guerra

    Mariano Guerra

    3 years ago
    • not a compiler • not a query to find ancestors in a family • not Fibonacci • not shape inheritance
    Mariano Guerra
    Vladimir Gordeev
    +1
    7 replies
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  • Vladimir Gordeev

    Vladimir Gordeev

    3 years ago
    I realized what kind of problem I look for: something that involves IO.
    Vladimir Gordeev
    m
    3 replies
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  • jarm

    jarm

    3 years ago
    I have a query about something that is out of my comfort zone, so the question itself might not be right, but here goes. I have a friend who has found a way to live code the Reaktor Core audio DSP language, such that they can do things like programmatically change connections in the audio graph. This led to the idea of live coding the audio graph itself as a potentially musical activity, for example scheduling a sequence of graph transformations, or sequencing the opening and closing of connections between nodes. The (potentially malformed) question is: what techniques might be useful to take inspiration from for an idea like this? Any papers or libraries that would be worth a look? I assume the relevant domain would be graph theory..? Thanks in advance
    jarm
    s
    +3
    20 replies
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  • Joe Trellick

    Joe Trellick

    3 years ago
    I finally listened to and enjoyed that Ted Nelson talk that @Daniel Garcia shared a while back:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JN1IBkAcJ1E

    I don’t feel it’s so useful in terms of ideas, but it’s a fascinating portrait of a visionary who hasn’t succeeded in bringing his ideas into the world during his travels through a very interesting part of history. While he’s still obviously stubborn, he came across as more charming than I remembered, then I laughed out loud when he hung a lantern on it and said he’d finally taken Dale Carnegie to heart
    Joe Trellick
    1 replies
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  • d

    David Piepgrass

    3 years ago
    @Kartik Agaram (branching my thread from #introductions) Can you offer examples of "existing languages [being] highly constrained in their degrees of freedom"? I usually find human language alone inadequate to discuss these matters, so I need to see specific examples. But yeah, we need to see programming language design itself as a multi-layered thing; indeed I see my task as helping to architect an entire ecosystem of languages. Decomposing a compiler and its standard libraries into many parts is insufficient, because you're still viewing it as one language (really two languages, the language being compiled and the implementation language - the implementation language shouldn't be that important, but without interoperability, it is). It's wasteful to design a new standard library for every new language, wasteful not to share common parts between languages, and in addition I think a big reason interoperability is hard is because we haven't learned how to share these things. (Interestingly, I hold to a "waste not, want not" philosophy in everyday life, as in PL design.) I created LES and Loyc trees in that spirit. Because they are so general, they have disadvantages as syntax trees - they are not specialized for your specific circumstances and aren't suitable in all situations.* Yet because it was designed for all programming languages, it avoids common impedance-mismatches - for example e.g. most languages disagree about what "identifiers" and "literals" are, but LESv3 says "anything goes" so it is naturally compatible with everything. I think every compiler could find a use for these without the usual impedence mismatches you'd usually suffer when crossing language boundaries. Regardless of the syntax or semantics of your language, you can use LES as a text format to express internal compiler data structures, or accept it as an input format so users can combine your language with preprocessors like LeMP. (* Note that you could, though, generate wrapper types to wrap Loyc trees in a language-specific manner, or implement an interface like ILNode so that although your syntax trees aren't Loyc trees, they can be consumed as if they were.)
    d
    w
    2 replies
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  • Dan Cook

    Dan Cook

    3 years ago
    Anyone exploring visualization of code/data (e.g. versus textual source code) should take a look at BV's "Magic Ink": http://worrydream.com/MagicInk (For the "short version", just look at all the diagrams, and read the surrounding text to see what he's doing with each one) It's about determining what a person is trying to find out from (or "questions" one has about) the data being presented (by a webpage, document, or program), and presenting it in such a way that the answers are immediately obvious at a glance. In other words, showing the data is good, but it's only the first step to making that data consumable / workable. He makes a strong case that a lot of "interactive" software would actually serve its purpose much better as a (dynamic) visualization.
    Dan Cook
    1 replies
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  • Mariano Guerra

    Mariano Guerra

    3 years ago
    I think this fits in this channel:1) What applications do you use that use drag and drop in an interesting way? 2) same question but web apps 3) same question but on mobile native 4) same but on mobile web 5) for mobile native but touch gestures 6) same as 5 but for mobile web
    Mariano Guerra
    w
    +4
    14 replies
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