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    Chris Maughan

    2 years ago
    There are several music languages that I know of which create music using patterns. They are: • FoxDot (Python) • Extempore - the recent pattern additions (Scheme) • TidalCycles (Haskell). There are references in the docs to Reactive Programming • IxiLang (SCLang) I'm researching pattern languages and their implementations. In particular how patterns are managed/looped/mutated. If anyone has interesting/useful sources, I'd be keen to know. Both languages I haven't thought of and general pattern management systems......
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  • e

    Emmanuel Oga

    1 year ago
    I've been thinking about why we still use absolute pitch relationships so much when describing music. It seems to me it would be more productive to talk about intervals, so instead of, say, C - E - G, we could talk about, say, 1 - 3 - 5, or whatever convention used to talk about intervals on a regular music scale. Not that notations like these are not already used, for instance I love the approach used in hookpad, and I want to learn more about roman numeral analysis. I recently learn about the Nashville numeral system too. Both these systems make a lot of sense to me.... And yet, even modern scoring tools like extempore keep using absolute intervals to notate music. For instance, for that extempore "clip" I was expecting to find, say, something like:
    (play `((5 _ 5) (3 _ 5) (_ _ 0) (3 _ 0)) `(#base 55))
    as opposed to just:
    (play `((60 _ 60) (58 _ 60) (_ _ 55) (58 _ 55)))
    A lot of the ordeal of learning how music works is about dealing (often through sheer memorization and "force of will" 😛 ) the explosion of combinations having to deal with asymmetry when it comes to perform certain patterns of note on actual instruments (Major scale, Minor scale, etc). In this regard I find isomorphic instruments very interesting as a solution to this complexity. I also feel like a notation like Dodeka is a step in the right direction.
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  • Max Krieger

    Max Krieger

    1 year ago
    Might be a repost but devine just uploaded

    https://youtu.be/I0WdaJNU6dY

    Max Krieger
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  • e

    Emmanuel Oga

    1 year ago
    fascinating video essay on music notation software

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XGo4PJd1lng

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    Emmanuel Oga

    1 year ago
    I've been playing with a new DAW and I gotta say, music production is still infuriatingly complicated. I'm using Native Instruments Kontakt and Bitwig in this particular instance. I need to "route" some notes connected from various tracks in Bitwig to a VST virtual instrument. I managed to make it work in 3 or 4 different ways, all of them requiring clicking through 3px-10px wide GUI controls (Kontakt doesn't support GUI scaling and everything is super small...). Things are hidden behind a trail of clicks in buttons, drop downs and select boxes ... frustation level: Lenny Kravitz's scarf.
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    Emmanuel Oga

    1 year ago
    Looking at alternative music notation again ... a bit of a rabbit hole. I was excited about dodeka but after actually trying to use it and staring at it for a while I find that it lacks redundancy, everything looks like a floating rectangle. KlavarScore looks good for piano playing. Found a small proposal (https://fastgram.org/) that both augments and simplifies traditional notation to good effect, I think. For guitar found this "brenna method" which uses color and shapes to add circle-of-fifths information to the fretboard. I feel like a combination of these elements could be fused together for a visualization that could help play and understand music in different instruments.
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    Emmanuel Oga

    1 year ago
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    Jack Rusher

    1 year ago
    Despite the click-bait/culture war title, this video is quite good:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Kr3quGh7pJA

    ... and everything it has to say about music theory also applies to our default notational conventions. (I would add, perhaps controversially, that most of the same things are true of our mathematical notation.)
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  • j

    Jack Rusher

    1 year ago
    As mentioned in #linking-together, MIT have opened access to all of their journal archives. People interested in computer music might particularly want to have a look at the Computer Music Journal and Leonardo Music Journal:https://www.mitpressjournals.org/loi/comj https://www.mitpressjournals.org/loi/lmj
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    Emmanuel Oga

    1 year ago
    love this: https://www.ethanhein.com/wp/2013/hip-hop-transcriptions/ pretty nice (seems obvious after you see it!) idea for a way to combine time box units with standard notation
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