• s

    Scott Werner

    2 years ago
    I think that would be an interesting breakdown to see - if you had to pick a side, do you believe code is primarily art or primarily engineering/science…or is that something different from what you’re saying @Kartik Agaram?
    s
    Kartik Agaram
    +4
    33 replies
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  • jonathoda

    jonathoda

    2 years ago
    Please consider submitting to the Convivial Computing Salon at <Programming> 2020. https://2020.programming-conference.org/home/salon-2020#Call-for-Submissions
    jonathoda
    Nick Smith
    +2
    7 replies
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  • Steve

    Steve

    2 years ago
    👋 Anyone else building, interested in or know others who are thinking glue code for microservices/FaaS solving observability in a distributed architecture - future of cloud programming …. trying to find my tribe 😉
    Steve
    Kartik Agaram
    +4
    21 replies
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  • Brian Hempel

    Brian Hempel

    2 years ago
    Webstrates (UIST 2015)? http://www.klokmose.net/clemens/wp-content/uploads/2015/08/webstrates.pdf
    We define shareable dynamic media as collections of information substrates (or substrates for short). Substrates are software artifacts that embody content, computation and interaction, effectively blurring the distinction between documents and applications. Substrates can evolve over time and shift roles, acting as what are traditionally considered documents in one context and applications in another, or a mix of the two. Substrates may be composed in various ways, e.g., one substrate can give meaning and structure to another. For example, a bar-chart substrate can define how to visualize a statistical data substrate.
    Brian Hempel
    s
    +2
    5 replies
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  • shalabh

    shalabh

    2 years ago

    https://youtu.be/gla830WPBVU

    shalabh
    s-ol
    +1
    11 replies
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  • Kartik Agaram

    Kartik Agaram

    2 years ago
    An outline of two extreme viewpoints that turns into a dramatic but subtly stated endorsement of end-user programming. Or am I just predisposed to interpret it that way? https://www.sicpers.info/2019/10/zen-and-the-art-of-software-maintenance There's an analogy here with typing. It used to be common to want to have secretaries who typed out things for us. That doesn't seem an aspirational goal anymore for most people. What are the reasons for this shift? Could they apply also to programming?
    Kartik Agaram
    Stefan
    +1
    12 replies
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  • Edward de Jong / Beads Project

    Edward de Jong / Beads Project

    2 years ago
    Mark Twain was the first author to submit a manuscript in typewritten form. He invested in an early typewriter. Given that you had no erase functions in early typewriters, it was the precision task of a secretary to spell and type accurately. As we invented the ability to erase mistakes, the need for a skilled typist gradually disappeared. Now with autocorrection, people can be awful spellers and the world will never know. You are correct that as computer programming gets easier, there will be less need for professional programmers, as simple programs will be done by end users. If you think about it, every day devices get more computerized, and users take more of the load off technicians. A mainframe computer would take 1 person 30 minutes to start up, now your cellphone can reboot in less than a minute, and all you gotta do is remember the keypress sequence to get it going or shut it down (if you even bother shutting it down)
    Edward de Jong / Beads Project
    i
    +2
    5 replies
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  • Konrad Hinsen

    Konrad Hinsen

    2 years ago
    This video is not quite about end-user programming, but about making the digital world comprehensible to end users, so I think it fits into this channel's topic:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F1G7-TNOgy8

    Konrad Hinsen
    1 replies
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  • d

    Dan Swirsky

    2 years ago
    I've been thinking about this quote by @jonathoda that @tomasp shared at https://twitter.com/tomaspetricek/status/1188835828933496838?s=08: "Why isn't there something as easy to use as spreadsheets, but as powerful as programming?". This made me ask a different set of questions: 1) What characteristics of spreadsheets are believed to directly contribute to the success of spreadsheets as an end-user programming tool? 2) Has anyone attempted to design a non-spreadsheet-based programming tool by using these characteristics as a roadmap? Regarding question #1, I found this excellent paper at https://www.miramontes.com/writing/spreadsheet-eup/. I haven't found anything else quite like it and was wondering whether anyone here knows of more research like it (I plan to write the authors as well). Regarding question #2, I found lots of projects that explore the programmability of spreadsheet tools, but that's not what I had in mind. Thoughts?
    d
    Don Abrams
    +4
    19 replies
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  • Edward de Jong / Beads Project

    Edward de Jong / Beads Project

    2 years ago
    One of the problems with spreadsheet usage stats is that a significant fraction of spreadsheets in the wild exercise nothing more than simple arithmetic; say monthly sums and a grand total of the yearly. One would be hard pressed to improve the usability of the system, when the user is doing so little data manipulation. Spreadsheets give the user 100% visibility of the data, but hide all the code. As long as you have negligible amounts of code this tradeoff works great. But i think most people would agree that spreadsheets are quite dangerous; so easy to remove a row without any trace of that mistake, and it is easy to make errors in formula ranges. The core functionality is really mostly unchanged since Frankston & Bricklin invented the category so long ago. I do think that an easier spreadsheet could thrive that has more safety checks against bonehead mistakes. So much of Excel's evolution has been to add rarely used complex features. I see Excel as the poor-man's database; it works remarkably well up to a million rows then it poops out. Having made a spreadsheet back in the day, it actually a pretty easy thing to program in the core, but all the graphical niceties make it an extremely complex beast to program.
    Edward de Jong / Beads Project
    tbabb
    2 replies
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