• Kartik Agaram

    Kartik Agaram

    1 month ago
    Kartik Agaram
    1 replies
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    hamish todd

    1 month ago
    John Carmack interview.

    https://youtu.be/I845O57ZSy4?t=8969

    He's talking about the creative ambitions for Doom as opposed to Wolfenstein. He uses the phrase "Turing complete design space", saying that Doom had one, whereas Wolfenstein didn't. It's not super hard to see what he means. Mathematically it probably doesn't correspond to any useful concept, but maybe it does? If so, what?
    h
    Tom Larkworthy
    +2
    13 replies
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  • Daniel Garcia

    Daniel Garcia

    1 month ago
    Render: Tools for Thinking, a 1-day conference, Wednesday, August 16, from 11:30-6pm ET. Has a really interesting lineup, including Howard Rheingold author of the book
    Tools for thought
    Daniel Garcia
    yeT
    +4
    9 replies
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  • Chidi Williams

    Chidi Williams

    1 month ago
    “The top row of alphabetic keys of the standard typewriter reads QWERTY. For me this symbolizes the way in which technology can all too often serve not as a force for progress but for keeping things stuck. The QWERTY arrangement has no rational explanation, only a historical one. It was introduced in response to a problem in the early days of the typewriter: The keys used to jam. The idea was to minimize the collision problem by separating those keys that followed one another frequently … QWERTY has stayed on despite the existence of other, more “rational” systems ... Although these justifications have no rational foundation, they illustrate a process, a social process, of myth construction that allows us to build a justification for primitivity into any system. And I think that we are well on the road to doing exactly the same thing with the computer. We are in the process of digging ourselves into an anachronism by preserving practices that have no rational basis beyond their historical roots in an earlier period of technological and theoretical development.”
    From “Mindstorms: Children, Computers, and Powerful Ideas” http://worrydream.com/refs/Papert%20-%20Mindstorms%201st%20ed.pdf
    Chidi Williams
    w
    2 replies
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  • Shubhadeep Roychowdhury

    Shubhadeep Roychowdhury

    1 month ago
    Shubhadeep Roychowdhury
    Peter Saxton
    +5
    8 replies
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  • Mariano Guerra

    Mariano Guerra

    1 month ago
    Join us for a night with Smalltalk pioneers and 2022 CHM Fellows Adele Goldberg and Daniel Ingalls to celebrate Smalltalk’s 50th anniversary. In an interactive discussion with moderator John Markoff, Goldberg and Ingalls will explore Smalltalk’s original mission in education and its influence on the world of object-oriented programming languages, development environments, and software engineering methodologies. Adding to the conversation will be newly-recorded remarks for this historic occasion from Smalltalk creator Alan Kay. https://computerhistory.org/events/making-smalltalk/
  • curious_reader

    curious_reader

    1 month ago
    Hello everyone! I hope you had a great summer so far. I found this to be interesting. For a long time it seemed the Dweb community and web3 to be at oods. But here we have Filecoin ( web3) founding spritely (dweb) . I'm looking forward to see more collaboration along these lines in the future: https://twitter.com/dustyweb/status/1559960708007305217
    curious_reader
    Duncan Cragg
    +3
    21 replies
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    Eric Normand

    1 month ago
    I experienced the phenomenon of "programming as theory building" firsthand. (continued in thread)
    e
    Kartik Agaram
    +1
    6 replies
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  • Shubhadeep Roychowdhury

    Shubhadeep Roychowdhury

    4 weeks ago
    Shubhadeep Roychowdhury
    Kartik Agaram
    +1
    3 replies
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    Personal Dynamic Media

    1 month ago
    Here's a classic paper that I have enjoyed for a long time. It really captures why it is so hard to learn your way around a program unless you are able to work with someone who wrote it or has been maintaining it. It also captures why having a rotating group of programmers who all work on the same code base without extended mentorship leads to a complete breakdown in conceptual integrity within the code base. Programming as Theory Buildinghttps://pages.cs.wisc.edu/~remzi/Naur.pdf
    p
    Kartik Agaram
    +7
    32 replies
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