• g

    Garth Goldwater

    2 years ago
    in my continued quest to sin myself directly into hell with my side project, i realized that i wanted to have a member of an array replace itself as the result of a method call, and the natural way to do that seemed to be something like having the last line of the method be
    this = newObject
    . that’s impossible in javascript—this is immutable and i’m not even sure how you’d update all the references in a coherent way (although i’m pretty sure it would make sense if you were doing enough pointer indirection). does anyone know of any cursed programming systems that let you do that kind of thing? i think there’s kind of an analogy in terms of replacing a server at a certain domain—all the hyperlinks stay pointing right at your new object
    g
    ibdknox
    +4
    8 replies
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  • j

    Jack Rusher

    2 years ago
    Nice work around an interface for entering curves into a livecoding system with an X/Y interface (mouse, pen, &c):https://twitter.com/awwbees/status/1294025917510168578?s=21
    j
    i
    +1
    6 replies
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  • i

    Ivan Reese

    2 years ago
    Huge mob of people talking about a (very good) game as literally, or at least analogous to, programming: https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=24155609. It's heartening to see this get so much attention, since my own FoC R&D is motivated by: real programming should look like this and be this joyful.
    i
    c
    +5
    13 replies
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  • shalabh

    shalabh

    2 years ago
    https://meaningness.com/metablog/pocket-computer Anyone else read meaningness? Anyway the author found an old essay from 1977 where they described the "pocket computer" - pretty interesting.
    shalabh
    j
    +2
    5 replies
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  • i

    Ivan Reese

    2 years ago
    Welcome to #linking-together! If you found a blog post, article, talk, book, podcast, paper, or other item of external media (collectively referred to as "links") that is in some way relevant to the future of computing, this is the place to share and discuss it. If you're going to add some commentary about your link, please include that as part of the same post as the link itself — if you split it across two or more messages, it'll be much harder to reference the link and discussion in the future, search for it, etc. • Links about the programming / world of the present should go to #present-company, unless they are framed with an eye to how the future will unfold. • Links about history are welcome here, since any view of history incorporates a sense of how things have evolved, which is one of the most powerful ways to understand how things will continue evolving. • Discussions that might include a link as supporting material, but center on your own thoughts or questions, should go in #thinking-together. • Feel free to post multiple links in the same post if they are directly related and should be discussed together. • If your link generates a rich preview, the preview may be removed by an admin if it doesn't offer meaningful value. Inline videos are meaningfully valuable. Good summaries of an article are meaningfully valuable. A generic image of some code text or a mountain scene accompanied by the name of the article... not valuable, will be removed without notice. Please provide adequate context in your post, explaining why we might be interested in the link, rather than relying on the rich preview. (After all, rich previews aren't searchable)
    i
    opeispo
    +1
    5 replies
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  • g

    Garth Goldwater

    2 years ago
    https://twitter.com/ashervo/status/1293653951309426688?s=21 even though the present state of visual scripting seems rough some people are still able to do complex and award-winning work with it!
    g
    c
    +5
    8 replies
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  • robenkleene

    robenkleene

    2 years ago
    Anyone have any thoughts on this piece about how the web is overshadowing native apps on the desktop? (This is from Brent Simmons, the developer of NetNewsWire, one of the most popular native Mac apps ever.) I’m particularly fascinated that the web has been so successful on the desktop (although really only in the last five years ago for use cases I personally care about, like creative apps) — but on mobile native apps are far more popular than the web. Both of these things are strange to me: That native is so much more popular than the web on mobile, and that it took so long for the web to make inroads for so many important uses cases on desktop. https://inessential.com/2020/08/15/desktop_means_web
    robenkleene
    d
    2 replies
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  • Nick Smith

    Nick Smith

    2 years ago
    In the last month I've been re-watching some of Rich Hickey's talks on the "right way" (my words) to design programming systems. I've seen many of them before, but I now have a personal knowledge base that is big enough for the insights of his talks to really hit me. I'm impressed with Rich's level of insight (even though it may be scoped to Clojure at times), and so I'd strongly recommend people to check out his most popular talks. There's an exhaustive list here. Some of my favourites: • Simple Made Easy (for learning how to evaluate whether your language constructs are well-designed) • The Value of Values (building upon Simple Made Easy, it asks us to reconsider the information models we define for our programming systems) • Are We There Yet (building upon The Value of Values, it suggests how we could model time and change in a value-centric programming system) • Spec-ulation (asks us to reconsider semantic versioning and APIs) • Effective Programs – 10 Years of Clojure (a big-picture talk that revises all of the prior talks, and makes some additional points) For the record, I've never used Clojure. So don't be fooled into thinking that his talks are only relevant to people who are interested in Clojure.
    Nick Smith
    Orion Reed
    3 replies
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  • Chris Knott

    Chris Knott

    2 years ago
  • Felix Kohlgrüber

    Felix Kohlgrüber

    2 years ago
    The following talk was mentioned on twitter and I really liked it. "Beautiful code: typography and visual programming" first talks about how code is still presented like it's the 70s and then goes more into visual programming and what the future of coding might look like.https://hilton.org.uk/presentations/beautiful-code
    Felix Kohlgrüber
    2 replies
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