• ogadaki

    ogadaki

    2 years ago
    Nicky Case has just made a new excellent explorable explanation, in collaboration with Marcel Salathé, a Swiss epidemiologist. It is about (drum roll) ... ... ... COVID-19! 😷 In fact the article nicely explains the spread of the virus and the effects of collective actions on it. With lots of tunable simulations, as usual. It helps me a lot reasoning about all this. In fact I was lazy until now 😴 and did not try to truly understand what is going on. So thanks, Nicky. 👍 https://ncase.me/covid-19/
    ogadaki
    i
    +5
    27 replies
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  • s

    Scott Newson

    2 years ago
    Just some scratch notes on a topic, any interest in talking about it or fleshing it out? Reading some blog about Firefox source code and development:- 21M loc - “unwieldy and not decomposable” Thinking about how to take advantage of this from a competitor’s perspective:- what would a corporate competitor do to encourage bad habits in an open source project like Firefox? What is bad for an OSS project? Thinking from the attacker’s perspective and thinking worst-case scenario (like a good security analyst).. What does a DOS attack on an OSS project look like?- submitting lots of superfluous/invalid/detailed bug reports that are difficult to replicate but sound important - lots of feature requests, perhaps lots of competing/incompatible features - regarding both bugs and features: this seems like something that a robust organization can handle with a good feature/bug triage process and reasonable estimates of available effort, but you have to ensure that the creation effort grows faster than the triage effort - obviously one counter is to incorporate identity and trust so that bad actors are flagged separately from those with a good reputation What about a DDOS? ie what is the equivalent of taking over others’ computers for a botnet? Perhaps:- encouraging lots of bad/junior contributions (ie identifying a community of juniors and encouraging participation in a way that doesn’t scale well, or which makes work harder for the more experienced/involved members) - encouraging churn (ie the competitor could hire any seniors/leads in the OSS project) - lots of badly architected contributions that add visible value (ie something that looks flashy in the usage of the OSS project, but in the implementation is tightly coupled across all parts of the project so that it is hard to refactor/simplify the whole)
    s
    s
    +1
    4 replies
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  • alltom

    alltom

    2 years ago
    In #general I mentioned a user study where I got a bunch of participants by embedding it within an intro to Node.js class. I rummaged around in my filesystem and found the original instructional materials for nostalgia's sake. Bits are funny in hindsight, like, "Node.js is minimalistic. Node.js programmers tend to make libraries that you can plug into your project, rather than frameworks that you're supposed to plug your project into." And stuff that was intended to be funny at the time, like, "[Redis is] 'schema-less', which means that your schema is defined in comments littered throughout your code, instead of in the database." But mostly, I'm just floored by how much effort I put in, like writing code examples where nearly every token has contextual explanation in styled hover-text, and taking incredible care to copy relevant reference information onto every page. So I thought I'd drop a link here for fun: https://github.com/alltom/node-course It's a series of static HTML files you're meant to open from your filesystem, but you can also just type the names after http://alltom.github.io/node-course/ The Theseus intro starts at http://alltom.github.io/node-course/public/tutorial-05.html I particularly like step 12.
    alltom
    1 replies
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  • Stefan

    Stefan

    2 years ago
    “The Law of Triviality states that the amount of time spent discussing an issue in an organization is inversely correlated to its actual importance in the scheme of things. Major, complex issues get the least discussion while simple, minor ones get the most discussion.”
    https://fs.blog/2020/04/bikeshed-effect/ What do we discuss the least here?
    Stefan
    d
    +5
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  • d

    daf

    2 years ago
    would that be a £300Bn mistake or a £500Bn software mistake?
    d
    i
    +3
    8 replies
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  • robenkleene

    robenkleene

    2 years ago
    Hope this doesn't offend anyone, that's not my intention, but I do think this is one of the most effective and concise ways of illustrating the absurdity of the relative capabilities of various technology stacks. And I don't even think the web comes up as a loser in those comparisons. E.g., if game engines are so good, why aren't more tools like Figma or Framer built in them? https://www.theolognion.com/unreal-engine-5-is-meant-to-ridicule-web-developers/
    robenkleene
    Chris Knott
    +6
    39 replies
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  • ogadaki

    ogadaki

    2 years ago
    After having just shared an article from Olia Lialina in #general, I share here her last work. I post it here, in #random, because I am not sure everyone will consider it as "programming" nor "future". Even if for me it can be considered as such: she defines a way to store a movie on the net and a way for a user to play it from a computer. 🙂 https://twitter.com/GIFmodel/status/1243158353808896000
    ogadaki
    Kartik Agaram
    +1
    4 replies
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  • robenkleene

    robenkleene

    2 years ago
    This is a great analysis of what the emergence of Figma as the UI design tool of choice might mean for other industries (e.g., Figma-for-X). https://paulbutler.org/2020/the-webassembly-app-gap/
    robenkleene
    Andy F
    3 replies
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  • j

    Justin Blank

    2 years ago
    Sure there are some esolang fans in here: https://xkcd.com/2309/
    j
    1 replies
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