• g

    Garth Goldwater

    2 years ago
    DylanTallchief ☰[+] (@DylanTallchief) Tweeted: There's been a lot of talk about DAWs in Excel, so I wanted to show a little something I've been working on https://t.co/IB3R1JJiJW https://twitter.com/DylanTallchief/status/1188816716689821702?s=20
    g
    1 replies
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  • r

    Robin

    2 years ago
    I'm wanting to develop a better medium for doing abstract math in. The basic form I want to experiment with is a freeform note-taking application where you draw/write on pages and where subsets of the page link to new pages. For example if I were to write L(v_j)=\sum a_{ij} w_j down on a page (but like with \sum a capital sigma etc. as if slack has LaTeX) then L, v_j, L(v_j), \sum, a_{ij}, w_j, i, j and the whole formula would all link to distinct pages. I'm familiar with python and c++ but haven't done any big projects with them. Is this something you have to dive into a particular GUI API to figure out how to program? I'm also curious if anybody has developed anything with this kind of indexing to new pages. The closest thing I can think of is an indie make-your-own-adventure game from 2010 called PlayPen. Definitely not intended for revolutionizing math but I managed to implement the above example here: http://playpen.farbs.org/index.php?title=Linear_Algebra . Some of the pages there juvenile but there is some cool stuff in it too.
    r
    j
    +1
    3 replies
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  • Shubhadeep Roychowdhury

    Shubhadeep Roychowdhury

    2 years ago
    Hey, I have used a language a while ago (many years to be precise) called Dark Basic. It was useful to experiment with my first game programming but then I moved to C++. Have anyone used it ever? What did you think of it?
    Shubhadeep Roychowdhury
    p
    +1
    8 replies
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  • Prathyush

    Prathyush

    2 years ago
    Have been researching the history of CS and the more I look into it, the more I feel it is deeply intertwined through the lives of people involved. For example Scott and Strachey worked together resulting in Denotational Semantics. Same Strachey used to be a classmate of Alan Turing, who was the student of Alonzo Church who made Lambda Calculus, who worked with Kleene resulting in Recursive Function Theory. Both of these mathematical models were used in the creation of Lisp by McCarthy. Peter Landin who used to work with Strachey creates the SECD machine which becomes an operational substrate for Lambda Calculus which is used along with Denotational Semantics to give a formal footing for today’s FP languages. To give a structure to this braided nature of CS history, I created a visualization here: https://twitter.com/prathyvsh/status/1197525794245009408?s=21 Would love to get any opinion on how I can improve this visualization!
    Prathyush
    Stefan
    +2
    10 replies
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  • b

    ballingt

    2 years ago
    Observable https://observablehq.com/collection/@observablehq/explorables is having a meetup in SF https://ti.to/observablehq/meetup/en and I'd love to see future of coding folks there! Observable is • almost-JS in a notebook interface that uses the DAG of your code to reevaluate spreadsheet-style • runs using your browser's JS engine, not on a server • leans into the visualization use case but is a very general platform aka hopefully sufficiently non-revolutionary to catch on
    b
    1 replies
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  • alltom

    alltom

    2 years ago
    Dropbox had a real-time sync API for a few common data structures (lists & maps, I think), but then they killed it. Google Drive had the same thing for a while, but then they killed it. I'm pretty sure they were just CRDTs with solid hosting infrastructure and client libraries. Does anybody know of stable alternatives that are more resilient to some company deciding the project doesn't make enough money and ceasing development?
    alltom
    ogadaki
    3 replies
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  • d

    Doug Moen

    2 years ago
    d
    Kartik Agaram
    +5
    14 replies
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  • Kartik Agaram

    Kartik Agaram

    2 years ago
    My motivation was always to create a general-purpose programming language that would solve all problems and be interpreted, but fast. I much preferred implementing and coding in LISP, but once I was dealing with big data sets and then having to do fairly simple calculations, APL just seemed to have the better vocabulary. It had to come up one level. Common LISP even then had about 2,000 primitives. I didn't like that. What I liked was the original LISP, which had car, cdr, cons, and cond, but that was too little. Common LISP was way too big, but a stripped-down version of APL was in the middle with about 50 operations. It's about the same size as C. But the thing about the languages that I implement is that
    there are no libraries: those 50 operations are it. Everybody builds from there, and the resulting programs are extremely short. -- Arthur Whitney, creator of J and K (https://queue.acm.org/detail.cfm?id=1531242)
    Kartik Agaram
    Mariano Guerra
    +2
    11 replies
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  • Stefan

    Stefan

    2 years ago
    What if you’d try to interpret the two famous quotes by Alan Kay “The best way to predict the future is to invent it” and William Gibson “The future is already here, just not evenly distributed” literally instead of figuratively?https://breakingsmart.substack.com/p/inventing-time
    Stefan
    Dan Cook
    +1
    3 replies
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