• w

    wtaysom

    3 years ago
    YouTube recommended a video about Arrow Types to me.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=McnKrV0aDjo

    w
    1 replies
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  • Dan Cook

    Dan Cook

    3 years ago
    I think a lot of y'alls might like Matt Parker's stuff (aka standupmaths) on YouTube, if you're a math person at all
    Dan Cook
    1 replies
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  • Stefan

    Stefan

    3 years ago
    A young aspiring programmer asks you as an expert and mentor:
    "I want to understand the most important programming paradigms and learn about the broadest set of language features out there. What is the minimal set of programming languages I should look at? Popularity and how widely used these languages are doesn't matter, I just want the highest 🤯:🤓 ratio to maximize my learning."
    Here's what I think: • C — for a simple, pragmatic, influential, and still widely used procedural language and to understand memory management • Smalltalk — for a highly dynamic language and environment, message passing and the origins of OOP • Lisp — because you wouldn't take me seriously if I left it off such a list • Haskell — for a pure functional, strongly typed language with laziness and strong compiler support (error checking, synthesis, etc.) • Forth — for an even simpler, but still highly expressive, extensible, and dynamic language • Datalog — for logic programming and constraint solvers (or maybe Prolog instead?) • Erlang — for actor model and concurrent programming What would you respond?
    Stefan
    d
    +8
    14 replies
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  • shalabh

    shalabh

    3 years ago
    https://gist.github.com/halgari/f431b2d1094e4ec1e933969969489854 Blurb titled "What I want from a Type System".
    shalabh
    Kartik Agaram
    +3
    16 replies
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  • Kartik Agaram

    Kartik Agaram

    3 years ago
    Kartik Agaram
    d
    +2
    23 replies
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  • Prathyush

    Prathyush

    3 years ago
    This is kind of a sanity check / knowledge representation question thats been bothering me for quite some time now. Whenever I end up modelling systems on a big scale, I end up drawing things like. So this is like layers of the system with each layer containing subsystems that can be layered or are graphs in themselves. Now these entities are in flux in that they change their topology as time progresses. This is the biggest model I can conjure up to visually articulate my conceptual understanding of most systems. My question is, are these the natural concepts to represent complex systems or are there simpler fundamental units that can be composed to build bigger systems that generate the desired system dynamics? Have you guys come across anything in the literature? I have this inkling that graphs . could probably be expressed with some sort of simple units of composition.
    Prathyush
    Stefan
    +3
    9 replies
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  • Kartik Agaram

    Kartik Agaram

    3 years ago
    Can anybody here shed light on what's going on in this paper? https://ironholds.org/resources/papers/anarchist_hci.pdf
    Kartik Agaram
    jonathoda
    +1
    3 replies
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  • Scott Anderson

    Scott Anderson

    3 years ago
    Interesting esoteric language based on a 2D Hilbert curve
    Scott Anderson
    d
    +2
    5 replies
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  • g

    Garth Goldwater

    3 years ago
    feeling extremely 2019 chaos energy from this take on visual programming: https://github.com/MSPaintIDE/MSPaintIDE/blob/master/README.md?utm_source=share&utm_medium=ios_app
    g
    i
    3 replies
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  • stevekrouse

    stevekrouse

    3 years ago
    stevekrouse
    i
    +1
    3 replies
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