• robenkleene

    robenkleene

    3 years ago
    Apple just announced a new framework SwiftUI that uses a "declarative syntax", and includes features in Xcode that allow editing source code and seeing the user interface changes live (it's not clear to me yet whether that can be done while the application is running, or only with a non-interactive preview of the UI) https://developer.apple.com/xcode/swiftui/
    robenkleene
    i
    +1
    6 replies
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  • y

    yoz

    3 years ago
    One of the things that hit me in the SwiftUI XCode demo (in the opening keynote, not PSOTU): at the very beginning, he clicks the rendered “Hello world” widget in the simulator panel; XCode focuses the editor panel and highlights the code for the widget instance in question. It’s blink-and-you’ll-miss-it fast, and the audience don’t react at all. I’d like to know: which existing web framework + IDE combos currently do this? Specifically: click a rendered component in a page (in a browser, or browser preview panel) and be taken to the code that instantiates that component?
    y
    Dan Cook
    +7
    20 replies
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  • g

    Garth Goldwater

    3 years ago
    terminology bikeshedding: I find this view taken by tiddlywiki to be kind of charming, as I often find generic terms get overloaded with overlapping definitions and implications from other applications of the same word. any opinions?
    g
    f
    2 replies
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  • Daniel Garcia

    Daniel Garcia

    3 years ago
    Adding to @yoz earlier point, here is a full video of SwiftUI, it looks quite impressive https://developer.apple.com/videos/play/wwdc2019/204/
    Daniel Garcia
    s
    +4
    22 replies
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  • robenkleene

    robenkleene

    3 years ago
    The just announced new Dropbox is potentially interesting to this group https://www.dropbox.com/features/new Mainly as an attempt to improve the file system.
    Quietly living inside file managers built by operating-system companies “served us well,” says Dropbox CEO and cofounder Drew Houston.
    robenkleene
    d
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  • y

    yoz

    3 years ago
    A separate thread based on @Daniel Hines’s comment https://futureofcoding.slack.com/archives/C5U3SEW6A/p1560278279045900?thread_ts=1560278176.045100&cid=C5U3SEW6A I’ve thought about WinFS on and off for years, often hearing the same refrain from others who yearn for what WinFS might have been. And now I’m turning on it: if a filesystem-level database was that good an idea, we’d have it already. I’m being deliberately provocative here because I genuinely want to know what problems WinFS could have solved that1. aren’t just as solvable at app/userspace level (sorry, I’m not an OS expert) 2. are based on what we know of WinFS’s actual API and capabilities, rather than capabilities of other databases that we wish a filesystem would have. (I’m also interested in apps using other databasey filesystem features, but it’s a slightly different discussion)
    y
    d
    +5
    35 replies
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  • Dan Stocker

    Dan Stocker

    3 years ago
    How would you try to get developers on board with a FoC solution (eg. VPL), that is turning into a product? Let's say the product can be shown to perform better from a technical point of view than its mainstream alternatives, integrates well with conventional code, and also has a kind of "coolness" quality to it. How and through what channels would you approach developers to try it / use it?
    Dan Stocker
    Kartik Agaram
    +2
    4 replies
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  • g

    Garth Goldwater

    3 years ago
    g
    Kartik Agaram
    +2
    25 replies
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  • g

    Garth Goldwater

    3 years ago
    apparently my favorite type of PL content is half-finished stuff from outsiders lol
    g
    f
    4 replies
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  • g

    Garth Goldwater

    3 years ago
    Enter TurboEditor. Because of this one simple little thing (not so little actually) that my friend found, we were able to decompile the entire CanDo program and figure out how it worked. Remember that important thing? Yes, that’s right, CanDo is actually written in itself and it could actually modify pieces that are currently executing. Let me clarify this just a little. One card could modify another card, then pull that card into focus. The actual card wasn’t currently executing, but the deck was. In fact, we came to find that CanDo was merely a facade. We also found that there was a very powerful object oriented, fully reentrant, self-modifying, programming language under that facade of a UI. In fact, this is how CanDo’s UI worked. Internally, it could take an element, decompile it, modify it and then recompile it right away and make it go live, immediately adding the updated functionality to a button or slider.
    While CanDo could modify itself, it never did this. Instead, it utilized a parent-child relationship. It always created a child sandbox for user-created decks. This sandbox area is where the user built new CanDo Decks. Using this sandbox approach, this is how CanDo built and displayed a preview of your deck’s window. The sandbox would then be saved to a deck file and then executed as necessary.
    g
    1 replies
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